Sunday, 19 October 2014

A family gathering: Five Ledaig expressions

 

I've always liked Ledaig. There, I've said it. My first experience of it was the basic expression purchased from Morrisons some years ago. At the time I didn't know why I liked it, it was brash, in your face, as well as making me feel somewhat "dirty", it made me think of burned things, but I think my initial liking related to the fact that most of those around me didn't like it. In that sense, it allowed me to express a degree of individuality, to be different from the rest, and maybe to seem somehow more "knowing" than those who disliked it. Whatever the reason, I continued to drink it and looked for opportunities to develop my knowledge and experience of this fine spirit from the Tobermory distillery. Over the last couple of years I've acquired a few different expressions and it was the visit of whisky buddy Jason @jasonbstanding to the whisky shed, who came bearing a wonderful old Ledaig expression, that prompted this piece.




Ledaig Single Malt Scotch Whisky (NAS) 42%abv (Distillery bottling)



Let's start with this bad boy. I use the term "bad boy" advisedly given that this dram, in familial terms, reminds me of the nephew that you find somewhat irritating. You know the one, you're at a family gathering, there are brothers and sisters, children, aunt's, uncle's etc. Your own children are well under control, adhering to the parental mantra "don't show us up"...but the others....pulling the cat's tail, shouting, running about at high speeds, bumping into chairs, eating too much, whining, constantly asking for the toilet, generally doing the things that "you wouldn't see our kids doing". But let's be clear, this dram is not irritating, it's simply playing around in a somewhat youthful and uncontrolled way. It's got the genetic material that could lead to the more mature, well rounded, qualities of the wider Ledaig family but at present they are simply possible futures.




        Nose: Burning hay, earthy notes, spent log fires, vanilla and tar, quite raw.



        Palate: Surprisingly gentle after the somewhat abrasive nose. There's a sweet 

        peatiness and I get a fleeting hint of mint


        Finish: Short and quite dry.

        I like it but I do have reservations. As an entry level Ledaig (whilst recognising 

        that some might see the 10yo as the entry level expression), this dram 

        might deter some from further exploration of the range. In the context of the other 

        delightful Ledaig expressions, this is definitely the most basic.








Ledaig (1998) 13 yo Malts of Scotland; Sherry Butt: Cask MoS 11010:  61.2% abv


     Give this a swirl and you're left with a caldera like oily rim round the glass, thick,

    viscous, and still present after three or four minutes.

     

     Nose: Despite the 61.2% abv, the nose is gentle & there are soft sherry notes, caramelised 

     sultanas with a hint of  liquorice. Peaty, antiseptic leather notes combine with a burnt grassy

     aromas....lovely


     Palate: Wow... this one hits the sweet spot. Smoky, getting some orange, more tar, the "sherry 

     line" integrated beautifully, but the sum is greater than the component parts....it's glorious!

     With water: Recommended; taking it down to 40-45% abv. The majority of drams, with the 

     addition of a few drops of water, open up gently, revealing more of themselves. There are also 

     those drams that have the capacity to deliver twice, and to do so in a very dynamic way, offering 

     new levels of complexity, releasing flavours held captive within the higher abv, and creating an 

     equally beguiling alter ego that is not simply a nuanced shade of the original...this is such a 

     dram.



My mind wanders during the tasting of these lovely drams and I'm drawn into memories of the summer walks to primary school in the sixties, not a long walk, about a mile and a half in total. My mum and dad couldn't afford a car so the walk was an integral part of our daily routine. As part of the journey we had to pass Orford tannery, a Victorian/Dickensian, stained, smoke scarred, stuck with blood building, oozing thick, unctuous odours; smells and vapours that contorted the face, pulled the nostrils apart, wedged them open, and insinuated dread, fear, and primordial horror into the naive olfactory senses of our incomplete bodies. In the winter this wasn't a problem, the cold air deadened the dead, but in the summer, the languid passive aggressive heat slow cooked the edifice, and passing the Tannery necessitated a two hundred yard sprint accompanied by attempts to trip each other, with the aim of leaving one of our merry troupe simultaneously squirming, laughing and puking, stuck fast in the miasma of long dead animals.


On those days when the wind direction and air temperature allowed a more leisurely stroll past the tannery, we would often pause and look beyond the weatherworn "Trespassers will be prosecuted" sign into the forbidden, mysterious tannery scrubland. Through the barbed wire fence we could see the lime pits....solid black pustulated ponds that generated many a scare story for us as kids. Fabricated, "excited child", bravado laden stories of bodies being thrown in, left to sink and dissolve, stories of narrow escapes, of being pulled from the pits before disappearing without a trace. Occasionally, we would be able to lauch hefty lumps of rock over the fence and into the nearest pit. The rock would hit with a resonant, onomatopoeic "perdunch", rest for a moment on the rippleless, tar-like surface before slowly dropping. It didn't sink, it was eaten by the pit, the thick, black, viscous lime jaws savouring the latest victim.


More often than not, our activities were curtailed by the muffled, smoke choked, garbled ranting of the caretaker who we nicknamed "Peggy". We knew little of him other than he was, to us, incredibly old (in reality probably mid to late 60's), he had "fag" on the go constantly, he had a club foot (possibly due to childhood polio), and he walked with a profound limp. This combination meant he was not the most agile of caretakers, wheezing his way round the perimeter fence with a "Capstan full strength" or "Players No6" plume of smoke in his wake, uttering gutteral and threatening noises directed at potential (and hypothetical) ingressors. Once "discovered" we would switch our 8 year old limbs into "run mode", let fly a volley of abuse, each member of our gang trying to outdo the other in terms of the quality and offensiveness of our tirade, and scarper....making our way either on to school or home.


NB. For those across the water - the word "Fag" refers to a cigarette



      ....it's amazing where a drop of whisky can take you!



Gordon & MacPhail Cask Strength Ledaig (1997) 56.8% abv - Refill Sherry Hogshead




Nose: Rich, deep, pungent....leather, tobacco, someone's left some cheese behind the lowest shelf in an antiquarian bookstore....there's a wonderful decadence to the nose.


Palate: Definitely a big hitter. The leather & tobacco notes continue onto the palate and are joined by fruit, wood and brine notes; it's a sumptuous combination!


Finish: Lingering....fruit, peat, is that a hint of chocolate?




This is the Black Sheep of the family. The mysterious, swarthy uncle who you've "been warned about". "Don't you dare go out for a pint with him....you know what will happen!" "Uncle Phil was never the same after that weekend!" and so on. He gets on well with the kids and seems to simply "tolerate" the other adults. He has the look of a man of stories, tales to tell, dark adventures, and a life immersed in chaos and danger.



Dramboree: Ledaig: 8yo (58.8% abv) Sherry Butt no 900173 (still available from The Whisky Exchange at time of writing £55)


 
                                      
        Not as viscous as the MoS but still a bit of a "glass hugger"


        Nose: There are sweet, smokey, sherried notes on what is, given the 58.8% abv, a 
        surprisingly gentle nose. There's the signature "earthy vegetal" notes that I find in most Ledaig 
        expressions.

        Palate: There's proper power in this dram! (although different from the G&M). To quote a Who 
        line, it's "Meaty, beaty, big & bouncy"! (being picky, I'd want to add "fruity" to that phrase)
        Finish: Med-long...lingering hints of liquorice.

        In comparison to the G&M this has sweeter, almost bubble gum notes. Water again adds 
        another dimension that is crying out for exploration.





Rare Old Single Malt: Ledaig: Distilled 1975 - bottled 2000: 40% abv


  Nose:
Now this is a different beast altogether. Perhaps "beast" is too strong a word, the nose is softer, more mellow. It contains what I would call the signature elements of the Ledaigs I have experienced but they are less pronounced. There is more perfume to this expression. It is gentle from the off, caressing the sides of the glass.


Palate: The smoke & peat, whilst certainly not an afterthought, is not the dominant force that is evident in the other drams. There's vanilla, a slight musty, smokiness....everything is toned down....hints of marshmallow. At forty percent there's no "burn on entry", it's meditative sigh of a dram.

This dram was a huge surprise to me. I admit to having a preference for slightly higher abv drams with certain "in your face" characteristics (all of which are present in the MoS, G&M, and Dramboree), but this expression had a seductive quality that charmed me. 




In terms of the Ledaig family, it is the sage, grandfather, slowly rocking in his favourite chair. It's blind master Po from Kung Fu, it's Obi wan, Yoda, Mr Miyagi, a sensei of a dram. There is none of the impulsive, wilful youth of the basic NAS, none of the "business like, aggressive drive and glorious ostentation of the MoS, Dramboree or G&M, There's a stillness and tranquility that is infectious, the dram sits you down, calms you down, allows you to breath.



      
                        What a wonderful selection of drams. I'd certainly recommend them if you've not already had the pleasure.










Sunday, 12 October 2014

A cocktail of whisky with a soupçon of positive psychology


So there's something to celebrate is there?


How often do we sit down and savour the moment, pause for reflection and simply become aware of what's going on around us, deliberately focusing on the positives in our lives? There's increasing evidence that this is happening less and less. It seems that, for many people, it's all too easy to let the good things in our lives pass us by, to be drawn to the negative, to be sucked into habitual patterns and engagement with shall we say, the negative mundanities of life (gossip, a focus on the self at the expense of others, being hypercritical as a default position....). One result of this within the world of psychology and more specifically within the therapeutic community has been the evolution of so called "third wave" approaches to both understanding and changing behaviour. Positive psychology (as an approach in its own right), offers a range of really interesting opportunities for changing habitual modes of thinking, away from those that are at odds with good mental health, towards those that may contribute to an altogether healthier mindset. Within the positive psychology approach, "savouring" refers to the use of thoughts and actions to increase the intensity, duration, and appreciation of positive experiences and emotions.






....Don't worry, I'm not evangelising about this approach (although, by and large, I'm comfortable with the basic tenets), this isn't therapy, it's simply a segway into an exploration of what is, I believe, an event to be savoured. The event in this instance is the Dewar's release of a range of whiskies with "age-statements".





An example of the habitual negativity within the whisky community that I've noticed of late, relates to the plethora of NAS (no age statement) whiskies that seem to be proliferating at the moment. I've always baulked at entering the NAS debate on Twitter or Facebook. There are a number of reasons for this but the main reason is that, apart from a few exceptions, the quality of the debate has been mediocre at best, ranging from those offerings that fall into the category of "ill-informed, vitriolic ramblings", those that are simply confused, and those that suffer from a lack of balance. With regard to exceptions, one of the more interesting, balanced, and in-depth online discussions can be found on Allthingswhisky. It's well worth a read as there are contributions from a good number of highly respected whisky writers and bloggers.


One of the few times that I've been tempted to "enter the fray" as it were, occurred when a plonker of a marketer (or worse - an "appendix" of marketers nb my own use of the collective noun), came up with the phrase "the tyranny of the age statement". I'm so grateful for the enlightenment that the "campaign" provided. Up to that point I'd been inhabiting the whisky world in a dissociative fugue, unaware that I'd been at the mercy of numbers for so long, blindly ignoring any bottle of whisky that confronted me "sin numero". What an idiot I was! If I had that person in front of me now I'd like to........Stop!....do you see what's happening?....Do you see how easy it is to slip into the vitriol, to don bitterness and frustration like a cheap suit? A suit that used to fit so well but one that I like to think I'm slowly outgrowing....let's get back to the point....something worth celebrating.

It was about the time that the NAS debate was in full flow that a group of fellow whisky passionistas and I were invited to the distilleries from which the Dewars range would be released, namely MacDuff, Royal Brackla, Craigellachie, Aultmore, and Aberfeldy. A brief account of some of my experiences on that trip can be found here   "Smoke me kipper I'll be back for breakfast".... It was clear that Stephen Marshall (Global Marketing manager) and his team did not have prescient knowledge of the "NAS hubbub" when 
he told The Spirits Business that We realised we weren’t maximising our assets....We started looking at the malt project four years ago and conducted research on competitors and different markets, speaking to retailers and whisky specialists to get opinions on things like age statements and caramel.”......but the timing was exquisite. 



The press release for the range opened with the following statement: - Glasgow, Scotland, 24 September 2014 – John Dewar & Sons Ltd., one of the most respected names in the world of Scotch whisky, today announced plans to release a range of new expressions and never-before-released single malts – the hidden gems of its single malt portfolio. This bold move, unprecedented in recent years, will introduce a treasure trove of top-shelf whiskies to consumers around the world.


The umbrella term for the range is the "Last Great Malts" collection. So here we have not one, not two, not three, but five distilleries releasing not one, not two, but a range of expressions over the coming months, each wearing their age proudly on their labels (N.B Every release by Bacardi will carry an age statement and be caramel-free). The first two distilleries Craigellachie and Aberfeldy have released their bounties to the public. I won't be reviewing the whiskies in this post, suffice to say that the drams that I tasted on the short tour were lovely. There have been a number of comprehensive reviews of the whiskies across various media outlets.


So for those of us who recognise that there are some superb NAS ( and BFYB "Bang for your Buck") whiskies (e.g. Nikkka from the Barrel, most, if not all of the Compass Box expressions, Karuizawa - Spirit of Asama, Aberlour A'Bunadh and so on ...), and who also love the added dimension of an age statement, and all that that can add to the experience of the whisky, let's pause and savour the moment. "Anticipation" is another experience to savour and with these new expressions on the horizon there is much to anticipate.