Sunday, 12 October 2014

A cocktail of whisky with a soupçon of positive psychology


So there's something to celebrate is there?


How often do we sit down and savour the moment, pause for reflection and simply become aware of what's going on around us, deliberately focusing on the positives in our lives? There's increasing evidence that this is happening less and less. It seems that, for many people, it's all too easy to let the good things in our lives pass us by, to be drawn to the negative, to be sucked into habitual patterns and engagement with shall we say, the negative mundanities of life (gossip, a focus on the self at the expense of others, being hypercritical as a default position....). One result of this within the world of psychology and more specifically within the therapeutic community has been the evolution of so called "third wave" approaches to both understanding and changing behaviour. Positive psychology (as an approach in its own right), offers a range of really interesting opportunities for changing habitual modes of thinking, away from those that are at odds with good mental health, towards those that may contribute to an altogether healthier mindset. Within the positive psychology approach, "savouring" refers to the use of thoughts and actions to increase the intensity, duration, and appreciation of positive experiences and emotions.






....Don't worry, I'm not evangelising about this approach (although, by and large, I'm comfortable with the basic tenets), this isn't therapy, it's simply a segway into an exploration of what is, I believe, an event to be savoured. The event in this instance is the Dewar's release of a range of whiskies with "age-statements".





An example of the habitual negativity within the whisky community that I've noticed of late, relates to the plethora of NAS (no age statement) whiskies that seem to be proliferating at the moment. I've always baulked at entering the NAS debate on Twitter or Facebook. There are a number of reasons for this but the main reason is that, apart from a few exceptions, the quality of the debate has been mediocre at best, ranging from those offerings that fall into the category of "ill-informed, vitriolic ramblings", those that are simply confused, and those that suffer from a lack of balance. With regard to exceptions, one of the more interesting, balanced, and in-depth online discussions can be found on Allthingswhisky. It's well worth a read as there are contributions from a good number of highly respected whisky writers and bloggers.


One of the few times that I've been tempted to "enter the fray" as it were, occurred when a plonker of a marketer (or worse - an "appendix" of marketers nb my own use of the collective noun), came up with the phrase "the tyranny of the age statement". I'm so grateful for the enlightenment that the "campaign" provided. Up to that point I'd been inhabiting the whisky world in a dissociative fugue, unaware that I'd been at the mercy of numbers for so long, blindly ignoring any bottle of whisky that confronted me "sin numero". What an idiot I was! If I had that person in front of me now I'd like to........Stop!....do you see what's happening?....Do you see how easy it is to slip into the vitriol, to don bitterness and frustration like a cheap suit? A suit that used to fit so well but one that I like to think I'm slowly outgrowing....let's get back to the point....something worth celebrating.

It was about the time that the NAS debate was in full flow that a group of fellow whisky passionistas and I were invited to the distilleries from which the Dewars range would be released, namely MacDuff, Royal Brackla, Craigellachie, Aultmore, and Aberfeldy. A brief account of some of my experiences on that trip can be found here   "Smoke me kipper I'll be back for breakfast".... It was clear that Stephen Marshall (Global Marketing manager) and his team did not have prescient knowledge of the "NAS hubbub" when 
he told The Spirits Business that We realised we weren’t maximising our assets....We started looking at the malt project four years ago and conducted research on competitors and different markets, speaking to retailers and whisky specialists to get opinions on things like age statements and caramel.”......but the timing was exquisite. 



The press release for the range opened with the following statement: - Glasgow, Scotland, 24 September 2014 – John Dewar & Sons Ltd., one of the most respected names in the world of Scotch whisky, today announced plans to release a range of new expressions and never-before-released single malts – the hidden gems of its single malt portfolio. This bold move, unprecedented in recent years, will introduce a treasure trove of top-shelf whiskies to consumers around the world.


The umbrella term for the range is the "Last Great Malts" collection. So here we have not one, not two, not three, but five distilleries releasing not one, not two, but a range of expressions over the coming months, each wearing their age proudly on their labels (N.B Every release by Bacardi will carry an age statement and be caramel-free). The first two distilleries Craigellachie and Aberfeldy have released their bounties to the public. I won't be reviewing the whiskies in this post, suffice to say that the drams that I tasted on the short tour were lovely. There have been a number of comprehensive reviews of the whiskies across various media outlets.


So for those of us who recognise that there are some superb NAS ( and BFYB "Bang for your Buck") whiskies (e.g. Nikkka from the Barrel, most, if not all of the Compass Box expressions, Karuizawa - Spirit of Asama, Aberlour A'Bunadh and so on ...), and who also love the added dimension of an age statement, and all that that can add to the experience of the whisky, let's pause and savour the moment. "Anticipation" is another experience to savour and with these new expressions on the horizon there is much to anticipate.